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Vikings


The Vikings didn't have horns on their helmets and other facts:

*8th to late 11th centuries.

 

* The old Norse Language, before Latin which spread with Christianity in the 11th-12th century was a fully formed language written in runes.

The , The three best-known Scandinavian runic alphabets are the Elder Futhark (around 150–800 AD), the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc (400–1100 AD), and the Younger Futhark (800–1100 AD). or fuþark, earliest rune inscriptions have been found dated circa 150 AD .

 

An example of Elder Futhark Runes in function, dated circa 5th-century AD

*Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Iceland, Sami people. The Viking didn't conform as a group of people from a single nation bound in boarders yet they were all scandinavian

*Before Genghis Khans 1162 – 1227 ownership of the area known today as Russia. It was settled and colonised by the Vikings. It could almost be theorised that the Vikings infact invented Russia.


*It was Viking technology which made the Vikings so powerful.
The Norse advancements in boat technology, meant the ships, could not only travel semi deep seas, such as the Baltic, which is how they got to England, but also with their shallow bottom, they could sail right up the rivers and attack deep in land.
Allowing a Viking fleet to just sail right down the River Thames to where ever they wanted to go.

*they kept their battle shields on the side of the boat. Firstly as it protected the individual when rowing if attacked. But also was a neat place to keep it out the way so they could fit more armed men on each boat. An excellent example of the functional design inherent in the naval war machine.

*The Norse were not just barbarians. The highest quality swords came from Viking Scandinavia. They really did have the best meterlagists.
When scientists inspected swords brazened with the logo 'Ulfberht' they found them although forged between 800-1000 AD, to be of the quality of metal we find after the industrial revolution 800 years later.




*Romans were small, about 5'3 the Germanic people of upper Europe and Scandinavian we now know, had a more varied diet, and life was just tougher there. Natural selection, seemed to make them all 6 ft tall and as wide as a barn door.
The Romans got drawn into the woods in upper Germania, about 60 000 men strong. However without the war machine style rank fighting, but hand to hand 1 on 1, no roman went home that day. And the Romans never went back to try.
Rome Finally Fell to the Germanic Goths in 410 AD.

*The Vikings most frequently raided monasteries. These tended to be poorly defended places, where not many put up much of a fight. They weren't motivated by religion, only loot.

*There is enough solid evidence to confirm, that the Vikings discovered America.

*We have found many Viking helmets to date. None of them, not even one, had horns on the side... well not yet anyhows.

 

 

 

 




The Vikings were a tough bunch, who also knew how to party!!!!

There is a book known as the Viking saga.... Almost everything we know about Vikings is written in the saga's...

The Viking Sagas are stories mostly about ancient Nordic and Germanic history, about early Viking voyages, the battles that took place during the voyages, about migration to Iceland and of feuds between Icelandic families. They were written in the Old Norse -language, mainly in Iceland.

The Vikings! - Crash Course World History
Vikings : Documentary on Viking Life and Culture
The Strangest Viking Documentary (Ivar the Boneless)

Ancient Aliens- The Viking Gods- S05EP11-

Astrix and the Gauls (1967) [FULL MOVIE]

Sword Fighting As It Was For the Vikings

THE REAL THOR ODINSON (VIKING HISTORY DOCUMENTARY)

 


 

Vikings (Danish: Vikinger; Faroese: Víkingur; Icelandic: Víkingar; Norwegian: Vikinger; Nynorsk: Vikingar; Swedish: Vikingar)

 








List of VIKING GODS:

Norse and Germanic Mythology.

MALE GODS:

Name Meaning of Name: Love Partners: God of: Children: Where
Mentioned :

Óðr 

(Old Norse)
"The frenzied one" Freyja   Hnoss, Gersemi Poetic EddaProse Edda

Vé 

(Old Norse)
Vé (shrine) Possibly Frigg  One of the three gods
of creation
None Poetic EddaProse Edda

Váli 

(Old Norse)
Something like "battle-slain" None revenge None Poetic EddaProse EddaGesta Danorum (as Bous)

Viðarr 

(Old Norse)
Possibly "wide ruler" None  forest, revenge and silence None Poetic EddaProse Edda

Vili 

(Old Norse)
"Will" Possibly Frigg   None Poetic EddaProse Edda

Ullr 

(Old Norse)
Something like "Glory" None winter,
hunt, and duel
None Poetic EddaProse
Edda
, skaldic poetry, Gesta Danorum, Thorsberg chape, toponyms in Norway and Sweden

Týr 

(Old Norse), Tīw, Tīg (both Old English),
Ziu (Old High German)
"God", derived from Proto-Germanic
*Tīwaz
Unnamed, possibly Zisa WAR None Poetic EddaProse
Edda
, skaldic poetry, 
Hadrian's Wall altar

Thor

Þórr (North Germanic), Þunor (Old English),
Thunaer (Old Saxon), Donar (Southern Germanic areas)
"Thunder", all names stem from Proto-Germanic *ÞunraR Sif (consort), 
Járnsaxa
 thunder
and battle
Móði and Magni, Þrúðr Most attestations of
Germanic paganism

Saxnōt

(Old Saxon), Seaxnet, Seaxnēat, Saxnat
(Old English)
Contested None   None Old Saxon Baptismal
Vow, Old English royal genealogies

Odin: Óðinn

(North Germanic), 
Wōden
(West Germanic), *Wōdanaz (Proto-Germanic) (see List
of names of Odin for more)
"Frenzy" Frigg 
(consort), 
Skaði
(Heimskringlonly), 
Gunnlöð,
Jörð, Rindr
war,
wisdom, poetry, and magic
See Sons of Odin Most attestations of Germanic paganism

Njörðr

(Old Norse)
Contested Once unnamed sister, once Skaði sea, wind, fish, and wealth Freyr, Freyja Poetic EddaProse EddaHeimskringlaEgils sagaHauksbók ring oath,
place names

Máni

(Old Norse)
"Moon" None   None Poetic EddaProse Edda

Meili

(Old Norse)
"the lovely one" None   None Poetic EddaProse Edda

Lóðurr

(Old Norse)
Contested None   None Poetic Edda, skaldic poetry

Loki 

(Old Norse)
Contested Sigyn, 
Angrboda
Trickster
and god of mischief
Nari/Narfi, Váli,
Fenrir,
Hel, Jormungandr, and Sleipnir
Poetic EddaProse EddaHeimskringlaLoka Táttur, Norwegian rune
poem, Danish folk tales

Hœnir

(Old Norse)
Contested None The silent god None Poetic EddaProse Edda, skaldic poetry

Höðr 

(Old Norse)
"Warrior" None winter None Poetic EddaProse EddaGesta DanorumChronicon Lethrense,Annales
Lundenses
, possibly Beowulf

Hermóðr 

(Old Norse), Heremod (Old English)
"War-spirit" None The heroic son of Odin Sceaf (Old English only) Poetic EddaProse EddaBeowulf, Old English royal genealogies

Heimdallr

(Old Norse)
"World-
brightener"
None guardian of Ásgarð None Prose EddaPoetic Edda

Freyr

(Old Norse), Frea (Old English), Yngvi 

(Old Norse), Ing
(Old English)

"Lord" Freyja, Gerðr  fertility Fjölnir
(Heimskringla)

Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificumPoetic EddaProse Edda,Heimskringla
Ögmundar þáttr dytts
Gesta Danorum, various others

Forseti 

(Old Norse)
"Chairman" None God of justice, peace and truth None Poetic EddaProse Edda

Dellingr

(Old Norse)
Possibly "the dayspring" or
"shining one"
Nótt dawn Dagr Poetic EddaProse Edda

Bragi 

(Old Norse)
Connected with Bragr
 ("poetry")
Iðunn  poetry, music and the harp None Poetic EddaProse Edda, skaldic poetry

Baldr

(Old Norse), Bældæg (Old English)
Old Norse form
is contested. Old English form directly translates as "shining day".
Nanna beauty, innocence, peace, and rebirth Forseti Merseburg IncantationPoetic
Edda
Prose EddaGesta Danorum,Chronicon LethrenseAnnales
Lundenses
, possibly Beowulf

 

GODDESSES:

 

Name Meaning of Name Love partners God of: Children Mentioned in:

Baduhenna

(Latinized Germanic)

Badu-, may be cognate to Proto-Germanic *badwa- meaning "battle." The second portion of the name -henna may be related to -henae, which appears commonly in the names of matrons. None   None Tacitus' Annals

Bil

(Old Norse)

Contested None   None Prose Edda

Beyla

(Old Norse)

Proposed as related to "cow," "bean," or "bee." Byggvir   None Poetic Edda

Eir

(Old Norse)

"Peace, clemency"[20] or "help, mercy" None healing None Poetic Edda, Prose Edda

Ēostre

(Old English)

"East" None spring None De temporum ratione

Freyja

(Old Norse) (See List of names of Freyja for more)

"Lady" Freyr, Óðr  love, fertility, and battle Hnoss, Gersemi Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, Heimskringla, Sörla þáttr

Frigg

(Old Norse)

Derived from an Indo-European root meaning "Love" Odin marriage and motherhood Baldr Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, Gesta Danorum, Historia Langobardorum

Fulla

(Old Norse)

Possibly "bountiful" None Frigg´s handmaid None Merseburg Incantations, Prose Edda

Gefjun

(Old Norse)

Related to "giving" Skjöldr, unnamed jötunn fertility and plough Four oxen Prose Edda, Ynglinga saga, Völsa þáttr,

Gersemi

(Old Norse)

"Treasure, precious object" None   None Heimskringla

Gerðr

(Old Norse)

"Fenced in" Freyr   Fjölnir (Heimskringla) Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, Heimskringla

Gná

(Old Norse)

Possibly related to Old Norse Gnæfa, meaning "to project" None   None Prose Edda

Gullveig

(Old Norse)

Contested None   None Poetic Edda

Hariasa

Possibly related to the valkyrie name Herja or meaning "goddess with lots of hair" None   None Stone from Cologne, Germany (CIL XIII 8185)

Hlín

(Old Norse)

Possibly related to the Old Norse term hleinir, itself possibly meaning "protects" None  consolation and protection None Poetic Edda, Prose Edda

Hretha

(Old English)

Possibly "the famous" or "the victorious" None   None De temporum ratione

Hnoss

(Old Norse)

"Treasure" None   None Prose Edda

Ilmr

(Old Norse)

Potentially related to Old Norse ilmr, a masculine noun meaning "pleasant scent" None   None Prose Edda, skaldic poetry

Iðunn

(Old Norse)

Possibly "ever young" Bragi youth None Poetic Edda, Prose Edda

Irpa

(Old Norse)

Possibly relating to "dark brown" None   None Jómsvíkinga saga, Njáls saga

Lofn

(Old Norse)

Potentially related to "Praise" None  forbidden loves None Prose Edda

Nanna

(Old Norse)

Possibly "mother" from nanna, or potentially related to nanþ-, meaning "the daring one" Baldr  joy and peace Forseti Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, Gesta Danorum, Chronicon Lethrense, Setre Comb

Nerthus

(Latinized Germanic, from Proto-Germanic *Nerthuz)

Latinized form of what Old Norse Njörðr would have looked like around 1 CE. None   None Germania

Njörun

(Old Norse)

Possibly related to the Norse god Njörðr and the Roman goddess Nerio None   None Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, skaldic poetry

Rán

(Old Norse)

"Theft, robbery" Ægir sea Nine daughters Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, Friðþjófs saga hins frœkna

Rindr

(Old Norse)

Possibly related to *Vrindr Odin   Váli Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, Gesta Danorum

Sága

(Old Norse)

Possibly "to see" None possibly another name for Frigg. None Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, skaldic poetry

Sandraudiga

(Latinized Germanic)

"She who dyes the sand red." None   None North Brabant stone

Sif

(Old Norse)

"In-law-relationship" Thor harvest Þrúðr, Ullr Poetic Edda, Prose Edda

Sigyn

(Old Norse)

"Victorious girl-friend" Loki love Nari, Narfi and/or Váli Poetic Edda, Prose Edda

Sinthgunt

(Old High German)

Contested None   None Merseburg Incantations

Sjöfn

(Old Norse)

"Love" None   None Prose Edda

Skaði

(Old Norse)

Possibly related to Scandia. Ullr, Odin, once Njörðr. winter Sæmingr Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, Ynglinga saga

Snotra

(Old Norse)

"The clever one" None prudence None Prose Edda

Sól

(Old Norse), Sunna (Old High German)

"Sun" Glen Sun Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, Merseburg Incantations

mSyn

(Old Norse)

"Refusal" None   None Prose Edda

Tanfana

(Latinized Germanic)

Unknown None   None Germania, Tamfanae sacrum inscription

Þrúðr

(Old Norse)

"Power" None   None Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, Karlevi Runestone

Þorgerðr Hölgabrúðr

(Old Norse)
Literally "Þorgerðr Hölgi's Bride" None   Hölgi, possibly others Jómsvíkinga saga, Njáls saga, Skáldskaparmál, Færeyinga saga

Vár

(Old Norse)
"Beloved" None contract None Poetic Edda, Prose Edda

Vör

(Old Norse)

Possibly "the careful one" None  wisdom None Prose Edda

Zisa

Possibly related to *Tiwaz None   Possibly Tyr



 

 

 

 


viking ship head








 

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